African American Funeral Program

Featured Stories and Project Points

FEATURED STORIES

Project Points

In doing this project I found that one can learn much about other people's cultures when given such a task. This is a study of African American Funeral Programs, not everyone participating in the project was African American which lets me know that I am not the only one who learned something. I believe we learn the most from our differences. I am a practicing Catholic and I saw many differences and similarities in the way things are done when it comes to funerals. 

First I had to recognize the difference between the Reverend and the Father. One officiates the "procession" and the other officiates the "mass". These are two different titles for the exact same job.

 

I do not recall many solos at Catholic funerals but they seem to be almost
mandatory in all of my entries in the study. But as far as music goes there is almost always a choir in a Catholic proceeding. I found the same to be true for the religions in our analysis. I came to the conclusion that every one would like to guide their loved ones way into eternity with the voices of these earthly angels.

Another similarity I found was the viewing of the remains. I really do
believe this is a question of the family's preference. I do not believe this has anything to do with religious beliefs. This is a good example in our similarities as people.

 

The most important similarity I noticed in this project is that we do such things at all. Our need to be comforted and need for unity at these times is universal. No denominational separation can take away the fact that we are a people who need other
people. We live life to make connections. The strength of these connections grows when another is sadly yet inevitably cut off. There may be a difference in practice, but there is no difference in the basic needs of people.

Prepare by Ariel Bosque

GENEVA MILLER

HISTORICAL SOCIETY